The importance of mantle wedge heterogeneity to subduction zone magmatism and the origin of EM1

Citation:

Turner SJ, Langmuir CH, Dungan MA, Escrig S. The importance of mantle wedge heterogeneity to subduction zone magmatism and the origin of EM1. Earth and Planetary Science Letters [Internet]. 2017;472 :216 - 228.

Abstract:

The composition of the convecting asthenospheric mantle that feeds the mantle wedge can be investigated via rear-arc lavas that have minimal slab influence. This “ambient mantle wedge” composition (the composition of the wedge prior to the addition of a slab component) varies substantially both worldwide and within individual arcs. 143Nd/144Nd measurements of rear-arc samples that have minimal slab influence are similar to 143Nd/144Nd in the stratovolcanoes of the adjacent volcanic fronts, suggesting that 143Nd/144Nd of arc-front volcanics are largely inherited from the ambient mantle composition. 143Nd/144Nd correlates with ratios such as Th/U, Zr/Nb, and La/Sm, indicating that these ratios also are strongly influenced by ambient wedge heterogeneity. The same phenomenon is observed among individual volcanoes from the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), where along-strike variability of the volcanic front tracks that of rear-arc monogenetic volcanics. Depleted mantle wedges are more strongly influenced by slab-derived components than are enriched wedges. This leads to surprising trace element correlations in the global dataset, such as between Pb/Nb and Zr/Nb, which are not explicable by variable compositions or fluxes of slab components. Depleted ambient mantle is present beneath arcs with back-arc spreading; relatively enriched mantle is present adjacent to continents. Ambient mantle wedge heterogeneity both globally and regionally forms isotope mixing trajectories for Sr, Nd and Hf between depleted mantle and EM1-type enriched compositions as represented by Gough Island basalts. Making use of this relationship permits a quantitative match with the SVZ data. It has been suggested that EM1-type mantle reservoirs are the result of recycled lower continental crust, though such models do not account for certain trace element ratios such as Ce/Pb and Nb/U or the surprisingly homogeneous trace element compositions of EM1 volcanics. A model in which the EM1 end-member found in continental arcs is produced by low-degree melt-metasomatism of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle may be more plausible. The 143Nd/144Nd maximum along the SVZ may be a consequence of either rifting and collision of two ancient lithospheric domains or a slab tear. The correspondence of mantle wedge variations with EM1 suggests a potential role for metasomatized sub-continental lithosphere in creating EM1 sources globally.

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